12 Week Training Manual

Intro to the Workforce Fitness Performance Center

Wrestling is one of the oldest combat sports in the world. It is believed that it was a major sport in the ancient Greek & Roman Empires. The sport flourished in the middle Ages and remained popular with the masses as well as the monarchies. Over the years, wrestling has become one of the major sports of the world. Some of the most popular styles of wrestling today are Freestyle Wrestling, Greco-Roman & Professional Wrestling. Professional wrestling, also known as pro wrestling, is the most popular of them all, and is extensively aired on television.

Although professional wrestling has incorporated most of the moves that are used in freestyle wrestling, certain finishing moves and attacks can only be performed in a pro wrestling match. Also, unlike Greco-Roman and freestyle wrestling, the moves in pro wrestling are choreographed and the wrestlers have to ‘act’ according to the script. However, it does not mean that the moves performed in pro wrestling are fake. Pro wrestlers are required to be fit and athletic so that they can pull off those stunning moves.

The problem with this is that from the perspective of an audience, watching two men in a clinch can get pretty boring, especially in an arena where most members of the audience are far from the action. In a competitive wrestling match, most of the spectacle happens when one wrestler shoots a takedown on another. Once the wrestlers hit the mat, the action turns subtle. Boxing’s emphasis on strikes and punches thrown per round is more audience friendly. UFC adopted the round and scorecard system from boxing in order to prevent every match from ending in the manner of old-style wrestling matches.

Professional wrestling evolved another solution, which was to dispense with actual combat in favor of theatricality and storytelling. As in opera or Kabuki, the Physical style of the performers is readable from the rafters. Performers develop signature moves that are recognizable to regular audience members.

Here isThe 12 Week Training Manual:​

Intro to the Workforce Fitness Performance Center and what you will be learning over the next 12 weeks of training with our Instructors.

BODY KNOWLEDGE & NUTRITION

We would like to start out from the beginning by asking our students to pay special attention to a number of things throughout your training career and life that we have been looking at in order to help keep you as healthy as possible as you start your journey into the exciting world of Professional Wrestling.

Getting & Keeping your Body in the Best Condition Possible can help you reach your full potential as a wrestler. If you’re in shape and physically fit, you can better handle moves your opponent may try on you during a match. Here are some fundamental aspects of fitness and wellness that can help you stay fit during your wrestling career

Getting plenty of Good-Quality Rest is critical to your success on the mat. Take at least one day off a week during the season, and get 8 hours of sleep every night. Practices and training shouldn’t last more than 180 minutes. Next I would like to share with you a study that was conducted with thousands of participants over dozens of years in the united states on the effects of sleep depredation or lack of sleep. In short, this study concluded that missing one hour of sleep was Equivocate with taking one week off your life. The study concluded that missing one hour of sleep was like reducing your lifespan by one week. The study continued to explain that because our body works on a 24 hour cycle you could not sleep 7 hours today and 9 hours tomorrow to make up for that 1 hour of sleep you missed the night before, in other words the damage was already done. So please my dear students, drink at least 8 glasses of water every day and get at least 8 hours of sleep every night & remember a healthy body is a healthy mind.

Closely check your skin every day for discoloration, swelling, areas of tenderness, and changes in texture. Scrub your body with antibacterial soap and wash your practice gear daily. Never share shirts, shorts, towels, or headgear with teammates. Impetigo, herpes, and ringworm are just a few of the skin diseases common to wrestlers that you can prevent by following these simple steps.

All wrestlers need to build their endurance if they want to be successful; in other words, you need to build your heart’s capacity for maintaining intense levels of exercise over time. To be ready for competition, you need to be able to run or ride an exercise bike continuously at moderate intensity for 40 minutes.

You and your coach need to develop training programs that increase the maximum amount of force your muscles can exert against resistance. Your muscles get stronger when you experience momentary muscular failure (the point at which you can’t accomplish any more repetitions of an exercise). The point of momentary muscular failure should occur on the 11th or 12th repetition of an exercise in the 2nd and 3rd set of a 3-set/12-repetition strength building plan. Some great fundamental strength training exercises include the bench press, shoulder press, triceps extensions, upright rows, pull-ups, leg extensions, leg curls, and arm curls

To become an agile wrestler with quick feet, you need to increase the ability of your muscles and joints to move through their full range of motion. You can develop your flexibility by doing light dynamic loosening exercises followed by stretching exercises before and after each practice. Dynamic loosening exercises include lunges, walking toe touches, high-knee jogging, lateral jogging, carioca jogging, and arm circles. As for stretching, focus on stretching the main muscle groups (hamstrings, quadriceps, hip flexors, lower back, shoulders, gluteal muscles, and neck); hold each stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.

You need to understand how carbohydrates, proteins, and fats affect your wrestling ability and training during exercise, after exercise, and before exercise. While the dietary needs of each athlete depend on a variety of factors, including age and gender, a good rule of thumb is to try to eat a diet consisting of 50 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent protein, and 20 percent fats.

Approximately 75 percent of your body is water. Because of the weight classifications in wrestling, you need to make sure you get the right amount of fluids before, during, and after exercise. Drink 2 to 3 cups of water four hours prior to exercise, 2 cups two hours before exercise, 2 cups 30 minutes before exercise and 1/2 cup of water every 15 minutes during exercise. After exercise, drink 2 cups of water for each pound lost during exercise. First when you urinate always look for two things, first you should visually see that your urine is clear in color and not yellow, orange or brown which can be an indication of anything from dehydration to blood in your urine, and second while urinating smell your urine and make sure that your urine is not very pungent to the smell. So please always look and smell your urine and make sure if your urine is not clear in color to drink more and more water until it becomes clear in color. This will help cleanse and flush your system on a daily basis. 

A head injury is a brain injury. So make sure to have a medical professional check you out right away after you suffer any type of head injury. Your doctor must also clear you before you can take to the mat again

 

Urine: We would like to ask our students to pay special attention to a couple of things throughout your training career and life that we have been looking at in order to help keep you as healthy as possible as you start your journey into the exciting world of Professional Wrestling.

First when you urinate always look for two things, first you should visually see that your urine is clear in color and not yellow, orange or brown which can be an indication of anything from dehydration to blood in your urine, and second while urinating smell your urine and make sure that your urine is not very pungent to the smell. So please always look and smell your urine and make sure if your urine is not clear in color to drink more and more water until it becomes clear in color. This will help cleanse and flush your system on a daily basis.

Sleep: Next I would like to share with you a study that was conducted with thousands of participants over dozens of years in the United States on the effects of sleep depredation or lack of sleep. In short, this study concluded that missing one hour of sleep was equivocated with taking one week off your life. The study concluded that missing one hour of sleep was like reducing your lifespan by one week. The study continued to explain that because our body works on a 24 hour cycle you could not sleep 7 hours today and 9 hours tomorrow to make up for that 1 hour of sleep you missed the night before, in other words the damage was already done. So please my dear students, drink at least 8 glasses of water every day and get at least 8 hours of sleep every night & remember a healthy body is a healthy mind.

KEEPING YOUR HEAD IN THE GAME: THE PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECT OF WRESTLING

Because of the one-on-one nature of wrestling and the relatively brief length of a match, the mental approach to competition and the commitment you need to succeed are unique. The following list provides some keys to winning the mental game as a wrestler:

  • Inspiration:

    External motivation and rewards can take you only so far; to be a great wrestler, you need to be truly inspired.

  • Positive Attitude:

    Successful wrestlers must be in the right positive mindset to win a match on any given day.

  • Strength in the Fundamentals:

    Great wrestlers understand the importance of the fundamental moves and work to improve them every day.

  • Style:

    You need to develop a style that fits your skills, strengths, personality and abilities. Each wrestler’s style is different, so you need to develop yours with confidence and then pay attention to the styles of your opponent’s so you can work with them.

  • Competition:

    Develop a desire for competition by competing all the time, even at practice. Maintain consistent intensity in everything you do both on and off the mat and stay focused on the task at hand.

  • Mental Toughness:

    Understand that concentration, confidence, self-control, and goal-setting are all mental drills that wrestlers have to master to gain a mental edge.

  • Learning to Fall / Bump:

    Learning to Fall / Bump can cause Headaches and Nausea. You will get bumps, bruises, and scrapes on a regular bases while training, so if you feel any of these symptoms please let your Trainers know.

  • Showing Respect:

    Showing Respect to the Trainers by being on time for training & Shows is a must, & makes a good impression. Remember these people are here to teach you the art of professional wrestling.

  • Lateness:

    Being Late will result in an extra 25 Jumping Jacks & 25 Japanese Squats in week one and will increase over the course of the program.

  • No Shows:

    No Shows without a valid excuse will result in an extra 50 Jumping Jacks & 50 Japanese Squats in week one and will increase over the course of the program.

  • Please Note:

    Missing 3 Classes without a valid excuse will result in termination of training.

A wrestlers's Worst Fear: Botch

The worst thing that can happen to a wrestler is a botch – when he fails to perform the move properly. Sometimes, it is simply humiliating. at Wrestlemania 19, Brock Lesner botched a shooting star press (see picture above) in the main event match. His victim was too far away and he under-rotated the backflip, landing on his head. broch escaped with only a concussion, but fans and performers alike still refer to a major botch as “Brocking” the move

Botches can also lead to severe injuries. During a pay per View event, “Stone Cold” Steve Austin misjudged a pile driver from Owen Hart, causing Austin to land forcefully on his head. The resulting neck injury temporarily paralyzed him. Hart managed to drag Austin on top of him so that Austin could win the match, as per script. He regained feeling and movement, but remains semi-retired because of the injury.

Week 1

  • You will learn how to Stretch & Warm Up properly.
  • How to Fall / Bump.
  • How to Run the Ropes.
  • How to get up, & always getting up to your right.
  • How to be loud and bigger than life inside the ring.
  • How to tell the story of who the Heel is and who is the Baby face. Plus the using of appropriate moves for both.
  • How Important Facial Expression is, remember we are here to entertain the Fans
  • How to tell the difference between Shoot & Work.

How to Lock Up (Collar & Elbow)

How to Lock Up (Collar & Elbow)

The Stunner is closely related to the Diamond Cutter or RKO. All are variations on moves called “Cutters.” To apply, kick your opponent in the stomach, grab their head while turning your back and fall down to the mat.

The object is either to slam their jaw into your shoulder or their face into the mat. The move can be hit from almost any position and is as versatile as the DDT. Also, it looks like it hurts. The audience can easily imagine losing teeth to the move. Stone Cold Steve Austin popularized the move and was able to convincingly stun 4 or 5 people in rapid succession, OH HELL YA.

Week 2

  • Stretch & Warm Up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 1.
  • Learn how to take a Turnbuckle, with your Back & Chest.
  • Learn how to do an up and over from the turnbuckle.
  • Learn how to be thrown in & out of the Ring from the corners, middle & top rope.
  • Learn how to get to the top rope properly, how to balance yourself on top.

Learn how to Drop an Elbow.

Featured Move of the Week: The Figure Four

The ultimate “Submission by Pain” move, it has been claimed that the Figure Four hurts the ankle, calf, femur, Knee, hamstring and quadriceps. Because of this, announcers can claim that the hold will deliver lasting Injuries. The Figure Four is most associated with the legendary Ric Flair but it was also used by Greg “The Hammer” Valentine, who had a gimmick where he made the move more deadly by wearing a shin guard that he would turn around to his calf before applying the hold. The best thing about the Figure Four is not just that the audience buys into it as a painful and debilitating hold but that it is easily countered, enhancing the drama. While putting the hold on, the attacking wrestler is vulnerable to being suddenly pinned in what’s called a “small package.” Also, if the wrestler in the hold can endure the pain they can “reverse the pressure” by Rolling over onto their stomachs. That counter became the basis of Sting’s “Scorpion Death Lock” also known as the sharpshooter made famous by Bret Hart.

Week 3

  • Stretch & Warm Up properly
  • Review everything you learned in Week 2.
  • Learn the Back Body Drop.
  • How to apply a Headlock, & Headlock takeovers.
  • How to apply a Snap Mare.
  • How to apply a Wrist Lock, Top Wrist Lock
  • How to apply a Hammer Lock.
  • How to do reversals to all the above mentioned & how to give the signal for the reversals.
  • Start Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

How to apply an Arm Bar.

Featured Move of the Week: DDT

The DDT is a simple but devastating move that used to be a common finisher. To perform a DDT you lock your opponent in a front headlock and then fall backwards, driving their forehead into the mat, floor, stairs or whatever happens to be underneath. Jake “The Snake” Roberts used it to knock people out so that he would let his boa constrictor Damian crawl all over them. With Roberts, the DDT was an involved affair. Others like Free bird Michael P.S. Hayes and Arn Anderson used it as a move they could perform in virtually any circumstance, stealing victory from defeat or turning the tide of the match in an instant. It’s now less common as a finisher as audiences have seen it so many times.

Week 4

  • Stretch & Warm Up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 3.
  • Learn how to throw Punches to the Head & Body.
  • Learn how to use Forearms.
  • Learn how to throw Upper-Cuts, European for example …etc.
  • Start learning the Psychology of Wrestling.
  • Character Development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Learn how to Throw a Chop.

Learn how to Drop a Leg.

Learn how to Drop a Knee.

Learn how to do an Enzuigiri Kick

Learn how to Deliver & Take a Close line.

Featured Move of the Week: Super kick

The super kick is most closely associated with Shawn Michaels who used it to kick his old tag team partner, Marty Jannetty, through a plate glass window, which is pro wrestling for, “I think we should dissolve our business relationship.” The great thing about the way Michaels uses the move is that he can either set it up as the last in his “moves of doom” sequence or he can just throw the kick out of nowhere. Typically, he will taunt a battered opponent by stomping on the mat, tuning up the band before delivering “sweet chin music.” But he might also just kick you out of nowhere.

The super kick is frequently used by wrestlers who claimed martial arts backgrounds (like “Sweet” Stan Lane of the Midnight Express) or by no-nonsense technicians like Lance Storm. It also frequently shows up with wrestlers claiming Polynesian descent like Haku, Rikishi and the Samoan Swat Team. Now, in wrestling for some reason, Samoans and Tongans are known as being supernaturally hard-headed. Head-butt them or ram their heads into the turnbuckle at your peril. The Samoan Swat Team had a bit where their opponents would slam their heads into something and they would bounce back, unaffected, and super kick their opponents in the face.

Week 5

  • Stretch & Warm Up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 4.
  • Learn how to Body Slam & Be Body Slammed.
  • Learn how to do a Hip Toss & Take One.
  • Learn how to do Arm Drag & Take One.
  • Learn how to do a Sunset Flip.
  • Learn how to do a Monkey Flip.
  • Learn how to do a Power Slam, both Running & Snap.
  • Learn how to know what you do well, what you don’t & where to use them.
  • Continue learning the Psychology of wrestling.
  • Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Learn how to do the Lou Thesz Press.

Featured Move of the Week: The Sleeper

Not a common finisher anymore, the sleeper and related holds like the cobra clutch are neck vices that one wrestler can use to render another unconscious by “cutting off the flow of blood to the brain,” which is legal while “cutting off the air flow” with a chokehold, is not. Wrestling has a strange morality to it. The sleeper is not exciting but the audience knows just how it works, so it reads well. It also creates some suspense when the bad guy puts the good guy in a sleeper the audience is left to wonder if their hero has enough will power to keep from passing out and to fight out of the hold. Of course, will power alone shouldn’t let your brain function without blood and oxygen but we are in a world of magical thinking. Bad guys like Roddy Piper & Ted DiBiase have used this hold, or its variants. Brutus the Barber Beefcake, a good guy, used to knock people out and then cut their hair off. 

These days, the sleeper is used most often in the middle of a match, to give performers a chance to catch their breath and possibly to discuss the next sequence of the events.

Week 6

  • Stretch & Warm Up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 5.
  • Learn how to do a Drop Toe Hold.
  • Learn how to do a Shoulder Tackle.
  • Learn how to do a Drop Down.
  • Learn how to do a Leap Frog.
  • Learn how to apply a Small Package.
  • Learn how to apply Covers & Pins at appropriate times.
  • Continue learning the Psychology of wrestling.
  • Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Learn how to do a Suplex & Take One.

Learn how to apply an Ankle Lock.

Featured Move of the Week: The Cradle Suplex

The point of a wrestling match is generally to score a pin fall or submission, but very few finishing moves attempt to achieve this except by inflicting a great deal of pain and then lying on top of an opponent who has been battered into immobility. The cradle Suplex, popularized by “Mr. Perfect” Curt Henning, exists specifically for the purpose of scoring a pin. When the move is completed, the opponent’s leg his hooked and his shoulders are on the mat. Whether or not he has been beaten up, he is in serious danger of losing the match. Mr. Perfect’s gimmick was that he was, well, perfect, and that meant that he had to win every match for a long period of time. Winning the match took precedence over dealing pain. The cradle Suplex, what he called “The Perfect Plex” was an elegant finisher, for a more civilized time.

Week 7

  • Stretch & Warm up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 6.
  • Learn the Surfboard.
  • Learn the Texas Cloverleaf.
  • Start the learning of the Suplexes.
  • Learn a Belly to Belly Suplex.
  • Learn the German Suplex.
  • Continue learning the Psychology of wrestling.
  • Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Learn the Boston Crab

Learn the Single & Double Leg.

Learn the Figure Four.

Featured Move of the Week: The Spear

Such a simple seeming idea, the spear is a running tackle to the opponent’s midsection. If the performer is lanky and has great explosive power, this can look like a cannon shot and is extremely impressive. The wrestler Edge probably has the best spear in the business as he can break instantly into a sprint, duck into the tackle and then uncoil like a snake. The great thing about a move like this is that it can come out of nowhere, creating surprising endings for a match. Other finishers demand more set up.

Learn the Spear.

Week 8

  • Stretch & Warm up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 7.
  • Learn the Vertical Suplex.
  • Learn the Snap Suplex.
  • Learn a Rolling Neck Snap.
  • Learn a Neck Breaker, and how to take one.
  • Learn the Fisherman Suplex.
  • Learn the Pump Handle Suplex.
  • Learn how to do an “Exploder”, “Belly to Back” & “Belly to Belly” Suplex.
  • Learn how to do the Superplex, & how to take it.
  • Continue learning the Psychology of Wrestling.
  • Start Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Featured Move of the Week: Top Rope Splash

Jimmy “Superfly” Snuka popularized this finisher that was later adopted by Rob Van Dam and Eddie Guerrero, among others. The idea here is that you beat your opponent prone and when he can’t move you climb to the top of the turnbuckles, leap into the air and land on him, chest to chest. The great thing about this is that the audience is left wondering if the splashy is going to roll out of the way. Before the splash either hits or misses, it’s still anyone’s match. In 1983, Snuka made history by delivering his splash to Don Muraco from the top of a steel cage at Madison Square Garden. Since then, leaps have come from ever-higher heights and agile performers have turned them into moonsaults, 360 degree twists and 450 degree aerial tumbles.

Learn the Slash.

Week 9

  • Stretch & Warm up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 8.
  • Learn how to Nip Up.
  • Learn how to do a Russian Leg Sweep.
  • Learn how to do a Flapjack.
  • Learn how to do a Power Slam, both Running & Snap.
  • Learn how to do a Power Bomb, & how to take one.
  • Learn how to do a Gut Wrench Power bomb.
  • Continue learning the Psychology of wrestling
  • Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Learn the Camel Clutch / Abdominal Stretch.

Learn how to do the Huracanrana / Franken Steiner.

Featured Move of the Week: The Pile driver

Most associated with Jerry Lawler, the King of Memphis wrestling and Terry Funk, the brawling cowboy who would as soon hit you with a branding iron as he would spit in your eye, the pile driver has a particularly dangerous reputation. As the name implies, the victim has his head driven straight into the mat, at a near 90-degree angle. As the move can believably break somebody’s neck, it has often been banned by promotions. As it is dangerous if not properly executed, you will not see it in the modern WWE ring. As the move actually has injured prominent performers in real life (including Steve Austin), audiences still buy the danger associated with it. The classic pile driver has largely been replaced by variations like the tombstone pile driver that better protects the victim’s head and neck.

Week 10

  • Stretch & Warm up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 9.
  • Learn how to do a Bulldog.
  • Learn how to do a Side Slam.
  • Learn how to do a Back Breaker, & how to take one.
  • Learn how to do a Cross Body, & a Diving Cross Body.
  • Start to Learn Working Submissions Holds.
  • Learn how to do the Sleeper Hold, & Cobra Clutch
  • Continue learning the Psychology of wrestling.
  • Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Learn the STF aka: Step Over Toe Hold Face Lock.

Learn how to apply the Cross Face.

Featured Move of the Week: The Power bomb

This is generally, but not exclusively, a move for wrestlers with monstrous size. It starts out like a pile driver but here the victim is hoisted into the air, above shoulder level and then hurled to the mat, to land on the head, back and shoulders. It may be a safer move than the Pile Driver because the victim can land on a larger surface area, but it can really shock the audience to see somebody hurled in such a manner. It tends to be associated with giants like Batista, Sid Vicious, Kevin Nash, the Undertaker (who has a variation called “The Last Ride”) and Big Van Vader.

Week 11

  • Stretch & Warm up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 10.
  • Learn how to Structure a Match.
  • Put together your First Match.
  • Continue learning the Psychology of wrestling.
  • Finish your Character development, Entrance Music, Work Name, & Outfit.

Featured Move of the Week: The Suplex

The simple Suplex as a wrestling move is the gift that keeps on giving. A basic Suplex has all kinds of uses during a match. The slingshot Suplex was, for some wrestling fans, made famous by Tully Blanchard of The Four Horsemen. A Superplex delivered off of the middle or top rope is impressive and causes fans to react. The setup for the Superplex has led to some awesome moves such as different versions of the brain buster and the corkscrew-tombstone pile driver Scott Steiner used to execute while in WCW. Fans still buy that a snap-Suplex is, for whatever reason, more powerful and more painful than a normal Suplex. “The Magic Killer,” “Jackhammer” & “Three Amigos” are a few more examples of moves that are branches from the original Suplex tree. It is probably only a matter of time before some young innovative wrestler out there creates his unique spin on the Suplex. We can’t wait to see it.

Week 12

  • Stretch & Warm up properly.
  • Review everything you learned in Week 11.
  • Structure a Match.
  • Film you’re match in Full Gear with Entrance Music. (For Your Pro Wrestling Debut ie: WWE, Impact, ROH, AEW, MLW, Triple A, QPW, NJPW)

Last Day: Certificate Award Ceremony with Coaches, Students, Family, Friends, Food & Drinks!